Fungi along the hike! (at Santa Lucia Preserve)

Fungi along the hike! (at Santa Lucia Preserve)

An adorable #jelly from Elkhorn Slough. #mbaqed  (at Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve)

An adorable #jelly from Elkhorn Slough. #mbaqed (at Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve)

Saw this poster in the hallways of a local high school. #feelings #nationalcomingoutday #equality  (at Watsonville, California)

Saw this poster in the hallways of a local high school. #feelings #nationalcomingoutday #equality (at Watsonville, California)

montereybayaquarium:

Have you seen it? A young great white shark was spotted in Monterey Harbor! Juvenile white sharks are typically found along southern California and Mexico—but warmer fall waters sometimes draw unusual guests into our bay.

Watch staffer Patrick Webster’s video of this beautiful animal

npr:

As The CW’s new superhero series The Flash debuts tonight, it seems there are more TV shows based on comic books in prime time than ever before.
And a look at two of the best new network TV dramas this fall also reveals two different ways to tell superhero stories on television, both with wonderful results.
It’s tough to find a more traditional superhero story than The CW’s take on The Flash, which opens with a voice over from the hero himself: "To understand what I’m about to tell you, you need to do something first … you need to believe in the impossible," he says, preparing the audience for a few shots of him speeding across town at supersonic speed.
In the comics, Barry Allen is a forensic scientist who gets covered in chemicals after a lightning bolt hits his lab. And that’s pretty much how The CW’s TV version goes, too.
'The Flash' And 'Gotham' Succeed By Taking Comic Book Stories Seriously
Photo credit: Jack Rowand/The CW

npr:

As The CW’s new superhero series The Flash debuts tonight, it seems there are more TV shows based on comic books in prime time than ever before.

And a look at two of the best new network TV dramas this fall also reveals two different ways to tell superhero stories on television, both with wonderful results.

It’s tough to find a more traditional superhero story than The CW’s take on The Flash, which opens with a voice over from the hero himself: "To understand what I’m about to tell you, you need to do something first … you need to believe in the impossible," he says, preparing the audience for a few shots of him speeding across town at supersonic speed.

In the comics, Barry Allen is a forensic scientist who gets covered in chemicals after a lightning bolt hits his lab. And that’s pretty much how The CW’s TV version goes, too.

'The Flash' And 'Gotham' Succeed By Taking Comic Book Stories Seriously

Photo credit: Jack Rowand/The CW

at The Ice Cream Shoppe

at The Ice Cream Shoppe

Newly collected #jelly from #mbari

Newly collected #jelly from #mbari

Perks of working at a #horseshow in #pebblebeach  (at Pebble Beach Equestrian Center)

Perks of working at a #horseshow in #pebblebeach (at Pebble Beach Equestrian Center)